Outstanding Science | Primary Science Resources for the National Curriculum

Primary Science Resources for the National Curriculum

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KS2 - Year 3 Plants

Learning objective

I can investigate how competition for resources affects plant growth.

Children grow 1, 4, 9 and 16 onion sets in 4 different pots. They make observational drawings and measure the height of the plants over 4 weeks. They use their measurements to complete a line graph showing the growth of all plants.

  • 3a2: explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant
Plants may not grow well if they have insufficient room for growth.
Results of experiments can be used to answer questions.
Results can be presented on a line graph.
Line graphs can show change over time.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science

Plant anatomy Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Plants | OS3A001

Learning objective

I can identify the main parts of different flowering plants.

Children look at 9 images of food plants. They identify the different parts, including roots, tuber, stem, bulb, trunk, branch, leaf, flower, and fruit. They discuss which part of the plant we normally eat.

  • 3a1: identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers
  • lks2w8: identifying differences, similarities or changes related to simple scientific ideas and processes
Parts of a plant include roots, tuber, stem, bulb, trunk, branch, leaf, flower and fruit.
Not all plants have the same features.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science

Plant Functions Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Plants | OS3A002

Learning objective

I can explain the functions of the different parts of a flowering plant.

Children label a diagram of a flowering plant. They explain the function of the flower, stem, leaves and roots. Children can cut and paste descriptions or write their own.

  • 3a1: identify and describe the functions of different parts of flowering plants: roots, stem/trunk, leaves and flowers
The stem provides structure for the plant and draws up nutrients and water.
The flower allows the plant to reproduce via pollination.
Some flowers are attractive to insects to facilitate insect pollination.
Roots anchor the plant in the soil and draw up water and nutrients.
The leaves of a plant are a key site of photosynthesis.
Photosynthesis is the process whereby plants use the energy in sunlight to convert water from the soil and carbon dioxide from the atmosphere into simple sugars for use as food by the plant.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science

The needs of different plants Investigation

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Plants | OS3A004

Learning objective

I can investigate the needs of different plants.

Over the course of 4 weeks, children compare the growth of a tomato plant, a cactus plant, and cress when grown in sand rather than compost. They identify the variable, make a series of observational drawings and explain what happened.

  • 3a2: explore the requirements of plants for life and growth (air, light, water, nutrients from soil, and room to grow) and how they vary from plant to plant
The amount of nutrients available in soil can affect the growth of plants.
A variable is the single quantity that is deliberately changed during an investigation.
A prediction is a guess about what will happen, supported by reason.
Scientific questions can be answered through investigation.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science

Water transport in plants Investigation

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Plants | OS3A005

Learning objective

I can investigate how water is transported in plants.

Children predict and measure how long it takes for coloured liquid takes to rise up the stem of a carnation flower and colour its petals.They make a drawing of the flower at the start and end of the investigation and predict what would happen if the flower had a shorter stem.

  • 3a3: investigate the way in which water is transported within plants
Plant roots transport water up through the stem to the other parts of the plant.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science

Life cycle of a flowering plant Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Plants | OS3A006

Learning objective

I can describe the life cycle of a flowering plant.

Children read about the 4 stages in the life cycle of a flowering plant - germination, growth, flowering, and fertilisation/seed production. They create a life cycle diagram, cutting and pasting descriptions and pictures or writing and drawing their own.

  • 3a4: explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
Some plants, but not all, are flowering plants.
Flowering plants experience a life cycle, like all other organisms.
Germination is when a seed starts to grow. Germination can be triggered by moisture and warmth.
Forming flowers and seeds is resource-intensive for the plant.
In order for a flowering plant to reproduce, pollen needs to move to the ovary of another flower.
Some flowering plants are pollinated by insects.
The pollinated ovary becomes a fruit which contains one or more seeds.
The offspring of flowering plants are slightly different from their parents.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science

Pollination methods Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Plants | OS3A007

Learning objective

I can explain different methods of pollination in flowering plants.

Children learn how pollination is vital to flowering plant reproduction. They read about insect pollination and create their own process description by either cutting and pasting descriptions or writing in their own words.

  • 3a4: explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
Flowering plants reproduce through pollination.
Pollination is when pollen travels from the stamen of one flower to the stigma of another.
Plants have evolved adaptations to facilitate pollination.
Some flowers have evolved scent, colour and nectar to attract insects.
In insect pollination, pollen sticks to an insect in one flower and rubs off in another.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science

Seed dispersal methods Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Plants | OS3A008

Learning objective

I can explain different methods of seed dispersal in flowering plants.

Children learn about different seed disperal methods eveolved by plants including dispersal by gravity, by wind, by water, and by animals. They examine 6 different images of fruits and seeds and try to explain how they might be dispersed.

  • 3a4: explore the part that flowers play in the life cycle of flowering plants, including pollination, seed formation and seed dispersal.
Plants have evolved seed dispersal methods to avoid overcrowding.
When a fruit rots, it provides nutrient for the seeds within.
Wind dispersal is when seeds are easily transported by the wind.
Water dispersal is when seeds float away to a different location.
Animal dispersal is when an animal eats a fruit or seed and it passes unharmed through its body.
Some seeds are dispersed by sticking to an animal's body and falling off in a different place.
Year 3 Plants | Outstanding Science