Outstanding Science | Primary Science Resources for the National Curriculum

Primary Science Resources for the National Curriculum

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KS2 - Year 3 Animals, including humans

Learning objective

I can explain how many portions of food from different food groups we should eat in a day.

Children learn about the 5 food groups - bread, cereals and potatoes (carbohydrates), meat and fish, fruit and vegetables, milk and dairy, and fats and sugars. They identify some food which belong to each of these groups. They create a pictogram showing how many portions of each food group they should eat in per day. They can cut and paste the pictogram symbols provided, or draw their own.

  • 3b1: identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
Animals need to eat food in order to survive.
Humans need to eat different types of food.
Carbohydrates give us energy over time.
Fruits and vegetables contain vitamins and minerals.
Meat and fish contain protein.
Milk and dairy contain calcium.
Fats and sugars should be eaten in limited amounts.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science

Animals and their food Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Animals, including humans | OS3B002

Learning objective

I can match animals to their food.

Children learn that animals can be classified as herbivores, carnivores or ominvores based on their diet. They cut out images of animals, paste them into the correct group, and identify a possible food source for each animal.

  • 3b1: identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
Plants are producers and make their own food.
Animals are consumers and eat other organisms.
A diet is what an animal eats.
Some animals are herbivores and eat only plants.
Some animals are carnivores and eat only meat.
Some animals are omnivores and eat both plants and animals.
The arrow on a food chain means 'is eaten by'.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science

Food chains Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Animals, including humans | OS3B003

Learning objective

I can create a food chain and explain what it shows.

Children learn that all living things ultimately get their energy from the Sun, either directly as a producer (plant) or indirectly as a consumer (animal). They cut and paste three simple food chains using the images provided. There is a blank food chain template on the third page so that children can create their own.

  • 3b1: identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
Plants are producers because they make their own food from the energy in sunlight via photosynthesis.
Animals are consumers and need to eat other organisms.
An ecosystem is a system of organisms that depend on each other for survival.
A food chain shows the movement of energy through an ecosystem.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science

Food webs Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Animals, including humans | OS3B004

Learning objective

I can create a food web and explain what it shows.

Building on their understanding of simple food chains, children use the images and template provided to create a complex food web containing 7 organisms. They learn that the arrows on food chain and food web diagrams indicate the energy flow through an ecosystem.

  • 3b1: identify that animals, including humans, need the right types and amount of nutrition, and that they cannot make their own food; they get nutrition from what they eat
A food web shows how food energy moves through an ecosystem in a nonlinear fashion.
The arrows on a food chain mean 'is eaten by', not 'eats'.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science

The human skeleton Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Animals, including humans | OS3B005

Learning objective

I can explain the functions of the human skeleton and identify its main bones.

Children learn about the three main functions of the human endoskeleton - to protect, to support, and to allow movement. They learn the names and locations of major bones, including the skull, jaw, humerus, radius, ulna, spine, pelvis, femur, tibia and fibula. Children cut out and assemble a 12-part human skeleton, labelling the main bones.

  • 3b2: identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.
Humans have an internal skeleton, or endoskeleton.
The three functions of the human skeleton are to support, protect, and allow movement.
Some of the main bones or bone groups in the human skeleton include the skull, jaw, spine, rib cage, pelvis, humerus, radius, ulna, femur, tibia, and fibula.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science

Muscles for moving Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Animals, including humans | OS3B006

Learning objective

I can explain how muscles work.

Children learn that muscles always pull and never push, and because of this they often work in pairs to allow movement in both directions. Using a template and some split pins, children create their own model of the human arm, with biceps and triceps pulling the lower arm up and down accordingly.

  • 3b2: identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.
Bones and muscles allow movement.
Muscles are attached to bones.
Bones meet at joints.
Skeletal muscles pull - they do not push.
We move when muscles contract, causing bending at a joint.
The biceps muscle contracts to bend the forearms at the elbow joint.
The triceps muscle contracts to extend the forearm at the elbow joint.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science

Animals and their skeletons Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Animals, including humans | OS3B007

Learning objective

I can match animals to their skeletons.

Children match three different animals to their endoskeletons. They use a word bank to identify and label the major bones, such as skull ribs, tusk, pelvis and spine. They discuss the similarities and differences between the skeletons.

  • 3b2: identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.
Some animals, like humans, have bony endoskeletons.
The functions of the skeleton are to protect, support, and enable movement.
Animals can be identified from their skeletons.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science

Types of skeleton Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 3 | Animals, including humans | OS3B008

Learning objective

I can identify which type of skeleton an animal has.

Children learn about the different types of animal skeleton - endoskeletons (skeletons on the inside), exoskeletons (skeletons on the outside), and hydroskeletons (boneless skeletons made of muscle). They cut out 15 different pictures of animals and paste them into the correct skeletal group.

  • 3b2: identify that humans and some other animals have skeletons and muscles for support, protection and movement.
Three functions of the skeleton are to support, protect, and allow the animals to move.
Some animals, like humans, have an internal or endoskeleton.
Some animals, like insects, have an external or exoskeleton. Some animals, like slugs, have a hydroskeleton composed of muscle that perform the same function as a bony skeleton.
Year 3 Animals, including humans | Outstanding Science