Outstanding Science | Primary Science Resources for the National Curriculum

Primary Science Resources for the National Curriculum

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KS2 - Year 4 Living things and their habitats

Learning objective

I can group organisms in different ways.

In this 2-player game, children cut out 24 images of animals and 12 challenge cards. They take turns challenging each other to group the images according to the challenge cards. Groups include tetrapods, herbivores, and mammals. When they have finished, children choose their favourite grouping method and use it to complete a 1-set Venn diagram.

  • 4a2: explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment
Living things can be grouped in different ways.
A tetrapod is a four-limbed animal .
Oviparous animals lay eggs.
Aquatic animals live in water.
Herbivores are animals which eat only plants.
Vertebrates are animals with backbones.
Invertebrates are animals without backbones.
Predators are animals which hunt, kill and eat other animals.
Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science

Grouping animals Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 4 | Living things and their habitats | OS4A001

Learning objective

I can group animals according to whether they are fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds or mammals.

Children learn about 5 different groups of animals - fish, amphibians, reptiles, bird, and mammals - and how we can identify them from their body features, behaviour, and life cycles. Children cut out 20 different images of these animals and place them in the correct group. They explain what the animals in each group have in common.

  • 4a1: recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways
Taxonomy means grouping.
Fish have gills and are oviparous.
Amphibians can move on land, but must stay near and lay eggs in water.
Reptiles have scaly skin and do not need to remain near water like amphibians.
Birds have feathers which help with insulation and flight.
Some birds are flightless.
Mammals give birth to live young, nurture them with milk, and have hair or fur.
Mammals, birds, amphibians and reptiles are tetrapods, though some have vestigial limbs.
Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science

Vertebrates and invertebrates Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 4 | Living things and their habitats | OS4A002

Learning objective

I can identify whether an animal is a vertebrate or an invertebrate.

Children learn that animals can be classified as vertebrates (having a spine) or invertebrates (lacking a spine). They cut out 15 different pictures of animals and place them in the correct group.

  • 4a1: recognise that living things can be grouped in a variety of ways
A vertebrate is an animal with a backbone.
An endoskeleton is an internal skeleton.
An exoskeleton is an external skeleton.
Some animals have no hard skeleton.
Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science

Identifying familiar organisms Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 4 | Living things and their habitats | OS4A004

Learning objective

I can use a classification key to identify familiar organisms.

Children learn that a dichotomous key (a branching classification key in which each question has exactly two answers) can be used to identify organisms. Children use the key provided to identify 12 different animals. They use a word bank to help them name the animals.

  • 4a2: explore and use classification keys to help group, identify and name a variety of living things in their local and wider environment
A classification key can be used to sort things.
Each question in a dichotomous key has exactly two answers.
Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science

Identifying invertebrates Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 4 | Living things and their habitats | OS4A005

Learning objective

I can use a classification key to identify invertebrates.

Children use a dichotomous classification key to identify 9 different types of invertebrate (centipede, slug, worm, snail, ant, beetle, woodlouse, spider and millipede). They cut and paste them in place and name them with the help of a word bank.

  • 4a3: recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.
A classification key can be used to identify things.
Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science

Creating a classification key Worksheet

Outstanding Science Year 4 | Living things and their habitats | OS4A006

Learning objective

I can create a classification key for a group of organisms from the local environment.

Children investigate the local area and draw pictures of 8 different organisms. They create their own classification key by repeatedly asking dichotomous questions (with exactly two answers), splitting the group up until each group only has one member. They discuss the best sort of questions to ask when making a classification key.

  • 4a3: recognise that environments can change and that this can sometimes pose dangers to living things.
A dichotomous kay can be created by repeatedly dividing a group of objects into two groups.
Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science

Habitats throughout the year Investigation

Outstanding Science Year 4 | Living things and their habitats | OS4A007

Learning objective

I can investigate how a habitat changes throughout the year.

Children select a habitat in the local environment. They draw a picture of how it appears now, and describe or measure the weather, temperature and hours of daylight. They predict what this habitat will look like in 6 months' time, and identify any changes that might take place. If possible, children revisit the site in 6 months and investigate the habitat as it actually appears.

    Habitats can change throughout the year.
    Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science

    The effects of deforestation Worksheet

    Outstanding Science Year 4 | Living things and their habitats | OS4A008

    Learning objective

    I can explain the reasons for deforestation and its negative effects.

    Children learn what deforestation is, and why humans deliberately choose to cut down trees and destroy forests. They learn about several negative effects of deforestation. Children use the writing frame provided to create their own information text on deforestation.

      Deforestation is the act of destroying forests.
      A main reason for deforestation is to clear land for agriculture.
      Deforestation can destroy habitats.
      Extinction is when there are no surviving individuals of a species.
      Deforestation can cause soil erosion.
      Year 4 Living things and their habitats | Outstanding Science